Haggis

This is a national dish of Scotland, I have always roughly, had an idea of what goes into it, and the fact that I cannot get this in the USA, as some of the contents are banned in the USA, such a shame, because I believe, most Americans that have visited Scotland have tried and enjoyed this local delicacy. But here I have the ingredients to make your own, if you can find what you need or suitable alternatives to banned ingredients. Enjoy!

1 sheep’s lung                                                                                                                               2224433212_9ae51dfab1

1 sheep’s stomach

1 sheep heart

1 sheep liver

1/2 lb fresh suet (kidney leaf fat is preferred)

3/4 cup oatmeal (the ground type, NOT the Quaker Oats type!)

3 onions, finely chopped

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1/2 teaspoon cayenne

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

3/4 cup stock

 

Be sure to wash the lungs and stomach well (nothing like eating unwashed organs), then rub them with salt and rinse. Remove all membranes and excess fat. Soak in cold salted water for several hours. Turn the stomach inside out for stuffing.
Put the heart and liver in a pot, cover with cold water. Bring it to a boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer for 30 minutes.

Chop the heart and coarsely grate the liver (I can honestly say I’ve never grated liver before, coarsely or otherwise). Toast oatmeal in a skillet on top of the stove, stirring frequently, until golden. Combine all ingredients and mix well. Loosely pack this mixture into your prepared stomach until it’s about two-thirds full (remember, oatmeal expands in cooking).
Press any air out of the stomach and truss securely (see picture above). Put into boiling water, enough to cover the haggis. Simmer for 3 hours, uncovered, adding more water as needed to maintain the water level. Prick the stomach (sounds like a fun kid’s game, doesn’t it?) several times with a sharp needle when it begins to swell. This keeps the bag from bursting.
Place on a platter, removing the trussing strings, and serve with a spoon. This dish should be served with all due ceremony with neeps and tatties (mashed turnips and mashed potatoes), and, of course, plenty of whisky.

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